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Eastern Indian/Frontier Art
 
Robert Griffing
     
 

Wardance

 
     
 

War Dance by Robert Griffing

 
     
 

Throughout the French and Indian War, English authorities negotiated with the Native Americans for their military assistance. While not as skilled at romancing them as their French counterparts, the English did experience some success, due partly to the influence of the Scottish Highlanders, whom the Indians viewed as being similar to themselves. Both cultures were consummate warriors and lovers of the fray, both had great respect for the orator and Chieftain, and both clan and tribe held ancient traditions in high regard. Their similarities in temperament and philosophy sometimes led the English to refer to the Scots as "cousins to the Indian."

Preparing for battle had its own Highland custom . . . the war dance. Here Robert Griffing shows a soldier of the 42nd Highland Regiment within the walls of Fort Ticonderoga seeking a prophecy by engaging in an ancient Highland tradition. According to clan tradition, if the dancer touches the swords beneath his feet during the dance, it's a forecast of doom for the coming battle. A piper provides the tunes. An Iroquois warrior watches, waiting for the results. An amused and approving smile appears on the face of a tribal headman as he keeps time with his drum.

 
 
 
 

Size - 18 3/4" x 25 1/2"
Signed and numbered Edition Size - 750
Price - $Sold Out - (please contact us for availability)

Also available as a 6 3/4" x 9" paper open edition
Price: $20.00
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